Show me the evidence: Cultivating knowledge on governance and food security

 
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I recently participated in a salon on integrating governance and food security work to enhance development outcomes. Convened by the LOCUS coalition and FHI 360, the salon gathered experts in evaluation, governance and food security to review challenges and best practices for generating evidence and knowledge. A post-salon discussion recorded with Annette Brown and Joseph Sany speaks to the gaps in evidence and the need to more accurately measure how governance principles influence food security outcomes.

I came out of the salon conversation thinking that while there was a hunger for evidence, there are still large gaps and significant differences within the literature on things as basic as definitions. That being said, I wanted to dig a bit more into what evidence was actually out there and think about what needs to be done to move this budding evidence base forward. In this post, I highlight three pieces of interesting research that contribute to the evidence base on governance and food security integration, and then propose a few suggestions on how to grow that knowledge base.

Four tips for turning big data into big practice

 
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Thanks to Annette Brown’s brilliant post last month, we now know what big data and data analytics are. Fantastic! The next question is: so what? Does having more data, and information from that data, mean more impact?

I’m lucky enough to be part of the Research Utilization Team at FHI 360, where it’s my job to ask (and try to answer) these kinds of questions. The goal of research utilization (also known by many other names) is to use research – and by implication data – to make a real difference, by providing the right information, to the right people, at the right time, in ways they can understand and be supported over time to use.

So, without further ado, I present to you four practical tips for turning BIG data into BIG practice.

Beyond research: Using science to transform women’s lives

 
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It was a warm spring day in 2011, and eight of my colleagues were helping me celebrate the realization of a long-awaited policy change in Uganda by sipping tepid champagne out of kid-sized paper cups. A colleague asked me, amazed, “How did you guys pull this off? What’s your secret to changing national policy?” I offered up some words about patience, doggedness, and committed team work. My somewhat glib response is still true, but since then I’ve thought a lot about what it takes to get a policy changed.

How to find the journal that is just right

 
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Goldilocks had it easy. She only had three chairs, three bowls of porridge and three beds to choose from, and the relevant features were pretty straightforward. It is not so easy to pick the right journal for publishing your research. First, there are hundreds of journals to choose from. Second, there are various features that differentiate them. And finally, some journals, like the three bears, are predatory and should be avoided. So how to find the journal that is just right for your research?

Null results should produce answers, not excuses

 
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I recently served on a Center for Global Development (CGD) panel to discuss a new study of the effects of community-based education on learning outcomes in Afghanistan. (Burde, Middleton, and Samii 2016) This exemplary randomized evaluation finds some important positive results. But the authors do one thing in the study that almost all impact evaluation researchers do – where they have null results, they make, what I call for the sake of argument, excuses.