3 women leading the charge in ICT4D research

 
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It’s no secret that the technology sector is riddled with major gender disparities. In the United States, discrepancies in employment and pay are so widespread that tech firms and the government alike regularly commission reports to evaluate why women comprise less than a quarter of the tech workforce and how this stifles growth. Couple the gender imbalances in the tech sphere with those in the research world and it’s not hard to conceive of the challenges faced by women conducting research in the information and communication technologies for development (ICT4D) field. As the 10th conference on ICT4D in Lusaka, Zambia, approaches in May, I’d like to take a moment to highlight the work of several incredibly talented women powering the evidence base for ICT4D.

Through an FHI 360-funded learning agenda project, Annette Brown and I recently created an evidence map that identifies and categorizes impact evaluations across the broad and multi-sectoral beast we term ICT4D. We used a systematic review approach to identify and code 254 impact evaluations across 11 ICT4D intervention types, such as digital identity and technology-assisted learning, that provide evidence in nine sectors. Researchers in the field have been busy – in the last five years the total number of publications providing rigorous evidence in ICT4D increased 311 percent. Below, I take a look at three pieces of evidence from the map and the women behind the work.

Mobile-based surveys: Can you hear me now?

 
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The technologies and processes we now have at our disposal to locate individuals and populations, push information to them, and gather information from or about them are being developed and refined at break-neck speed. Tools utilizing mobile technologies alone – voice services, SMS, Interactive Voice Recognition (IVR), Unstructured Supplementary Service Data (USSD), location-based services, data-based survey apps, chatbots – have introduced new opportunities to reduce the time, cost, uncertainty and risk in gathering data and feedback. As mobile coverage and access have expanded globally, governments, marketing firms, research organizations and international development actors alike have been iterating on approaches for using mobile-based surveys in their initiatives and programs. This post presents key takeaway lessons regarding the methodology, feasibility and suitability of using mobile surveys based on experience from our Mobile Solutions, Technical Assistance and Research project (mSTAR) in Mozambique.