Mobile-based surveys: Can you hear me now?

 
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The technologies and processes we now have at our disposal to locate individuals and populations, push information to them, and gather information from or about them are being developed and refined at break-neck speed. Tools utilizing mobile technologies alone – voice services, SMS, Interactive Voice Recognition (IVR), Unstructured Supplementary Service Data (USSD), location-based services, data-based survey apps, chatbots – have introduced new opportunities to reduce the time, cost, uncertainty and risk in gathering data and feedback. As mobile coverage and access have expanded globally, governments, marketing firms, research organizations and international development actors alike have been iterating on approaches for using mobile-based surveys in their initiatives and programs. This post presents key takeaway lessons regarding the methodology, feasibility and suitability of using mobile surveys based on experience from our Mobile Solutions, Technical Assistance and Research project (mSTAR) in Mozambique.

How many scientific facts are there about science, technology, and innovation for development?

 
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There is a lot of excitement these days about science, technology, and innovation and the potential for these activities to contribute to economic and social development globally. The flurry of activity begs the question, how much of this excitement is supported by scientific facts? To help answer this question, the US Global Development Lab at USAID commissioned a project to create and populate a map of the evidence base for science, technology, innovation, and partnerships (STIP). As part of the project, scoping research was conducted to identify not just where there are evidence clusters and gaps, but also where the demand for new evidence by stakeholders is the greatest. In the recently published scoping paper, I and my co-authors analyze the data in the map together with the information from the stakeholders to recommend priorities for investment in new research on STIP. While there is good evidence out there, new research is necessary for strategies and programming to fully benefit from scientific facts. In this post, I briefly describe the research we conducted, summarize a few of the many findings, and list some of our recommendations.