Seizing an opportunity to collect user experience data

 
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Contraceptive clinical trials routinely collect vast amounts of data, but what new data can we collect about method acceptability during this research stage? If a method has reached the clinical trial phase, we’d hope formative acceptability research was already conducted to inform its development and to determine if a potential market exists. At this point in the game, few changes can be made to a method based on acceptability findings… so what’s left to learn?

Hypothetically speaking… If we build it, will they come?

 
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Contraceptive product development efforts, to date, have largely been premised on the notion that if we build it, they will come. Primary attention has been paid to making products that work, with the assumption that if women want to avoid pregnancy, they will use them. While the desire to avoid pregnancy is an extremely powerful motivator, it is not enough. For many women, the fear of contraceptive side effects or the challenge associated with accessing and using contraceptives is greater than the burden of another pregnancy.

Some argue that to improve uptake and continuation rates, we need to improve provider counseling around contraceptive side effects and address socio-cultural barriers, such as inequitable gender norms, that prevent women from using contraceptives. These efforts – while essential – are still insufficient. Even the most informed and empowered women can have unintended pregnancies when they don’t have access to acceptable contraceptives – methods that meet their particular needs in their particular life stage and context.

As researchers, how do we shift the model of contraceptive development to focus first on what users want from an ideal contraceptive?

Beyond research: Using science to transform women’s lives

 
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It was a warm spring day in 2011, and eight of my colleagues were helping me celebrate the realization of a long-awaited policy change in Uganda by sipping tepid champagne out of kid-sized paper cups. A colleague asked me, amazed, “How did you guys pull this off? What’s your secret to changing national policy?” I offered up some words about patience, doggedness, and committed team work. My somewhat glib response is still true, but since then I’ve thought a lot about what it takes to get a policy changed.